Plaza Classroom 188

Schedule

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2014
Friday, March 21st
3:30 PM

A Coin from Caesarea Philippi: Julia Domna

Laura De La Torre, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

3:30 PM

3:45 PM

Displaying Loyalty in the Midst of Rebellion: Jewish Loyalist Coins in the 1st Century

Eric Kim, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

3:45 PM

4:00 PM

A Period of Transition: Early Islamic and Umayyad Coinage

Anna Tiner, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

4:00 PM

4:15 PM

The History and Legacy of the Patrick Henry and Thomas Jefferson Religious Debates

Andrew Krawtz, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

4:15 PM

4:30 PM

Don’t Touch! Examining the Role of Hands-On Children’s Programs in Museums

Kristin Brisbois, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

4:30 PM

5:00 PM

Person/Persona

Sarah Attar, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

5:00 PM

5:15 PM

The Extimate Mind

Kai Woods Decker, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

5:15 PM

5:30 PM

Research, Scholarship, and Les Mis

Constantine Nicandros, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

5:30 PM

2015
Friday, April 3rd
3:30 PM

Character and Time as Sources for Presidential Greatness

Adrian R. Davis Mr., Pepperdine University
Brian Newman Dr., Pepperdine University

Rockwell Academic Center 170

3:30 PM - 3:45 PM

3:45 PM

American civil religion in Aaron Sorkin’s biggest hits, The West Wing and The Newsroom

Savannah M F Janssen

Rockwell Academic Center 170

3:45 PM - 4:00 PM

4:00 PM

Vocational Narratives of Senior Executive Retirees in a Technical Agency and Their Sense of Safety in the Workplace

Sarah Bender, Pepperdine University

Rockwell Academic Center 170

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM

4:15 PM

Central Nervous System Strategy for Roche Pharmaceuticals

Kali A. Jelen, Pepperdine University

Rockwell Academic Center 170

4:15 PM - 4:30 PM

4:30 PM

BREAK

Please use this time to visit the Art Exhibition in Payson Library.

4:30 PM - 4:45 PM

4:45 PM

Human Predation Affects Grunion Spawning Events

Emily R. Pierce, Pepperdine University
Karen L. Martin, Pepperdine University
Vince V. Quach, Pepperdine University

Rockwell Academic Center 170

4:45 PM - 5:00 PM

5:00 PM

Correlation Between Freezing Sites and Xylem Vessel Diameter for Three Chaparral Species of the Santa Monica Mountains

Kaitlyn E. Sauer
Theadora V. Ordog
Nicole A. P. M. K. O. M. Nakamatsu

Rockwell Academic Center 170

5:00 PM - 5:15 PM

5:15 PM

Preserving the Ecology of the Sandy Beaches

Christian Wright, Pepperdine University

Rockwell Academic Center 170

5:15 PM - 5:30 PM

5:30 PM

Comparison of Downstream Cell Survival Responses in HUVECs and HLECs During VEGF Signaling

Haley Smith

Rockwell Academic Center 170

5:30 PM - 5:45 PM

Pepperdine Chamber Choir: Why International Travel is Essential for Young Musicians

Andrew G. Leidenthal
LoRee Wilkinson

Plaza Classroom 188

5:30 PM - 5:45 PM

5:45 PM

Comparative Foliar Water Uptake and Leaf Hydrophobicity among Eight Species of California Ferns

Victoria Lekson, Pepperdine University
Helen I. Holmlund, Oklahoma Christian University
Stephen D. Davis, Pepperdine University
Nicole A. Nakamatsu, Pepperdine University
Amanda M. Burns, Berea College

Rockwell Academic Center 170

5:45 PM - 6:00 PM

2016
Friday, April 1st
4:00 PM

BEAUTIFUL IS AS BEAUTIFUL DOES: AN INTEGRATED SOCIAL MARKETING CAMPAIGN TO REFRAME BEAUTY

Bonnie E. Efird 7048065119

Plaza Classroom 191

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM

Extensive Dieback in Malosma laurina in Coastal Exposures of the Santa Monica Mountains Associated with Unprecedented Drought in California

Gina S. Gilderman, Pepperdine University
Kaitlyn E. Sauer, Pepperdine University
Gabriella N. Palmeri, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 190

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM

4:15 PM

Root Hydraulic Conductance in Malosma laurina Experiencing Severe Dieback in the Santa Monica Mountains

Natalie M. Aguirre 5861995
Avery Davis, Pepperdine University
Sarah Nelson, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 190

4:15 PM - 4:30 PM

4:45 PM

Changes in Spawning Events of the California Grunion, Leuresthes tenuis, in Los Angeles County

Emily R. Pierce, Pepperdine University
Karen L. Martin, Pepperdine University
Vincent Quach, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 190

4:45 PM - 5:00 PM

5:00 PM

Drought-Induced Fungal Infection Causes Severe Dieback in Malosma laurina in the Santa Monica Mountains

Kaitlyn E. Sauer, Pepperdine University
Helen I. Holmlund, Pepperdine University
Shaquetta Reese, Alabama State University
Gabriella N. Palmeri, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 190

5:00 PM - 5:15 PM

5:15 PM

The effect of nitrate on the release of glucose into the hemolymph of crayfish, Procambarus clarkii

Alec R. Flores, Pepperdine University
Lee Kats, Pepperdine University
David Green, Pepperdine University
Gary Bucciarelli, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UCLA

Plaza Classroom 190

5:15 PM - 5:30 PM

2017
Friday, March 24th
3:30 PM

Perception and Barriers to CalFresh Utilization Among Asian Pacific Islander Ethnic Groups in Greater Los Angeles

Naomi T. Louie
Loan Kim, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

3:30 PM - 3:45 PM

3:45 PM

Development and Testing of a Pilot Integrated Mental Health and Nutrition Education Program for Low-Income Families in Southern California

Rachel Spitz, Pepperdine University
Loan Kim, Pepperdine University
Judy Ho Gavazza, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

3:45 PM - 4:00 PM

4:00 PM

Effects of stream flow rate on caddisfly case building

Morgan A. Clark, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM

4:15 PM

Empirical evaluation of the lone star tick’s theoretical niche through experimentation

William Ota, Pepperdine University
Javier Monzon, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

4:15 PM - 4:30 PM

4:30 PM

BREAK

4:30 PM - 4:45 PM

4:45 PM

Piccolo ma Forte: The Child Narrator’s Role in Cultural Collective Processing of Historical Events

Meghan J. Doyle, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

4:45 PM - 5:00 PM

5:00 PM

Choral Music and the Czech National Identity

Preston A. Hereford, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

5:00 PM - 5:15 PM

5:15 PM

Trade and food price volatility in Africa

Lionel Ong, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

5:15 PM - 5:30 PM

5:30 PM

Media's Representation of Emotional Eating: A Content Analysis of Emotional Eating in Chick Flicks

Mary Nell Johnson, Pepperdine University
Kelsey N. Foreman, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

5:30 PM - 5:45 PM

5:45 PM

Part 1: Pepperdine Journal of Communication Research

Meghan J. Doyle, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

5:45 PM - 6:00 PM

6:00 PM

Part 2: Pepperdine Journal of Communication Research

Meghan J. Doyle, Pepperdine University

Plaza Classroom 188

6:00 PM - 6:15 PM

2018
Friday, March 23rd
3:45 PM

Investigation of Antimicrobial Properties of Rhus ovata Extracts

Sydney T. Adams, Pepperdine University

BPC 190

3:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Native peoples of Southern California historically used a variety of local plants as remedies for illnesses. Chaparral species such as Rhus ovata (sugar bush) were widely available and were used to ease headaches, coughs and chest pains, and colds. In light of the historical importance of this plant and other chaparral species, recent fungal pathogen-induced diebacks of Malosma laurina, a species closely related to R. ovata, have raised questions regarding the innate defenses of these plants against fungal pathogens. We attempted to scientifically evaluate the traditional medicinal use of R. ovata and its antifungal resistance by testing two hypotheses: 1) Will an extract of R. ovata leaves have antibacterial properties? 2) Will an extract of R. ovata leaves have antifungal properties? In order to test the first hypothesis we used a 96-well plate assay growth assay with resazurin dye to measure the growth of the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus after treatment with various concentrations of a R. ovata leaf extract. Treatment with high concentrations (1 mg/mL) of R. ovata leaf extract inhibited growth of S. epidermidis and S. aureus, but at lower concentrations the extracts did not inhibit the growth of either organism. In order to test the second hypothesis we used a fungal disc diffusion assay on potato dextrose agar to measure the growth the fungus Botryosphaeria dothidea after treatment with R. ovata extracts. These extracts did not inhibit the growth of the fungus. Our results support the traditional use of R. ovata by Chumash Indians as a treatment for some ailments, however the lack of antifungal activity indicates that R. ovata may have alternative resistance mechanisms to ward off fungal pathogens such as B. dothidea that are currently causing dieback of related chaparral species.

4:00 PM

Does the fungal pathogen (Botryosphaeria dothidea) exceed the dehydration tolerance of its chaparral host?

Cristian M. Garcia

BPC 190

4:00 PM - 4:15 PM

We tested the hypothesis that an opportunistic endophytic fungus Botryosphaeria dothidea that frequently infects and causes dieback in several different species of chaparral shrubs in the Santa Monica Mountains continues to elongate and grow in host tissues at dehydration levels that exceed host survival. This was done by collecting several large branches from the field from three dominant species of co-occurring chaparral shrubs, Malosma laurina, Ceanothus spinosus, and Ceanothus megacarpus. We allowed branches to dehydrate at increasing lengths of time, from a few days to one week, in an air-conditioned laboratory, then sealed in plastic bags to allow tissuewater equilibration, and measured water potential at different dehydration levels. Stem segments were then inoculated with the fungal pathogen B. dothidea, sealed into test tubes, and allowed to incubate for a total of six days. After six days of fungal growth, lengths of hyphal invasion into stem tissues was recorded and final water potentials were determined using a dew point hygrometer. In Malosma laurina (± 3.74 SE, n = 30), exceeding the survival limits of the host plant (100% cavitation of stem xylem at -4 MPa). In Ceanothus spinosus (± 2.91 SE, n = 30), approaching the survival limits of the host at -9 MPa. In Ceanothus megacarpus (± 3.34 SE, n = 30), also approaching the survival limits of the host at -13 MPa. This indicates that the invasion and growth of the fungal pathogen B. dothidea in the stem xylem of these co-dominant chaparral species can continue under severe drought conditions recently experienced in California and likely contribute to the whole plant mortality increasingly observed for these species.

4:15 PM

The Effects of Dietary Nitrate Supplementation as an Ergogenic Aid on NCAA Division Female Soccer Players

Hannah Cooper
Susan E. Helm PhD, Pepperdine University

BPC 190

4:15 PM - 4:30 PM

Undergraduate Research

4:30 PM

Examining a Relationship Between Chronic Dietary Folic Acid Deficiency and Activation of p53 Gene in Down Syndrome Ts65Dn Mice

Julia Thomas
Susan E. Helm PhD, Pepperdine University
Jay Brewster, Pepperdine University

BPC 190

4:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Seaver Undergraduate Research

4:45 PM

Effect of Presence or Absence of Dietary Folic Acid upon mouse model of Alzheimer Disease, Pilot data

Sen Lin
Dr. Susan Helm
Dr. Ahmed Salehi

BPC 190

4:45 PM - 5:00 PM

Alzheimer’s disease impacts 18 million patients worldwide. An early indicator of Alzheimer's disease is the degeneration of locus ceruleus neurons and reduction of norepinephrine concentration in locus ceruleus projection areas. The neurotoxin N-(2- chloroethyl)-N- ethyl-bromo- benzylamine (DSP 4 ) has been demonstrated to cause severe damage to locus ceruleus neurons and cortical norepinephrine transporters in mice. It has been observed that mice injected with DSP4 also present with elevated amyloid amyloid b levels and impaired spatial memory performance when compared with control mice. To effectively examine Alzheimer's disease, It is critical to develop a model that mimics the amyloid b (Ab) and tau pathology as well as the neuroinflammatory component of the disease. Using our pilot data, we designed an experiment (ongoing) to measure the effects of chronic folic acid deficiency in a mouse model of Azheimer's disease. To accomplish this, we have injected the mice with either saline (control), or 10 mg/kg DSP 4 (low dose) or, 50 mg/kg DSP 4 (high dose); then testing the C57bl mice using several behavioral and cognitive tests (ability to build a nest with Nestlets; occurrence of rearing using Open Field testing [OF]; curiosity using Novel Object Recognition[NOR]) during the spring and summer of 2018. In summer of 2017, we performed pilot tests by injecting C57bl/6 mice with varying levels of DSP 4 in order to determine the optimal dosage that manifests accurate rearing in our OF testing, a recognized measurement of Alzheimer’s disease in the mouse model. The DSP 4 injected mice used for the pilot tests were placed in OF tests, an experiment commonly used to measure general locomotor activity levels and anxiety in rodents. Data for the pilot study demonstrated that a significant portion of the mice died if injected with 50mg/kg DSP 4 within 3 day intervals. Mice with one injection of 50mg/kg DSP 4 did not show significance in overall 15 minute OF tests with regards to rearing or line crossings when compared with mice that were injected with saline. Indeed, significance occurred when data points were compared using minute by minute’s intervals.

5:00 PM

Does Purchasing Behavior of WIC Participants Align with Recommendations for the WIC Food Package Revision?

Loan P. Kim Dr, Pepperdine University
Sydney Sauter, Pepperdine University
Shannon Whaley Dr, PHFE WIC

BPC 190

5:00 PM - 5:15 PM

The WIC food package provides an important benefit for mothers and children. Since 1974 the food package had not undergone any major revision until 2009, when it was revised to align with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) and Healthy People 2020 goals. Recently, USDA commissioned an expert committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) to review the current food package and provide recommendations for the next cycle of revision. Recommendations by the committee include increasing the dollar amount of the cash value voucher (CVV) along with the addition of fish in order to improve alignment with the recent DGAs. The committee also recommended supporting cultural preferences and requiring states to offer additional options for various food categories. The current study was undertaken in 2016 to explore how participants choose WIC foods during the shopping experience. In-person interviews were conducted with 204 participants from five ethnic groups and in four languages at WIC sites around Southern California. This session will present information about what participants shared about their purchasing behavior for WIC foods. Over two-thirds of all participants reported looking at the prices of FV, and 80% reported using their own money to buy more FV. Across all ethnic groups, when asked which WIC foods participants would like more of, FV were the most frequently requested. Asian participants also preferred more fish. These results and many others suggest recent NASEM recommendations will further improve the acceptability of the food package, particularly among ethnic minority participants.

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