Presentation Title

Frame Narratives Within the Short Stories of Kate Chopin

Presentation Type

Poster

Keywords

“A Lady of Bayou St. John, ” Frame Stories, Kate Chopin, “La Belle Zoraïde”

Department

English

Major

Political Science and Psychology Double-Major, English Minor

Abstract

Traditionally, scholars have interpreted framed stories such as Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness using the conventional “picture-frame” narratological approach. Otherwise known as the nested narrative, the “picture-frame” model perceives works via a structural binary akin to the usual “story within a story” paradigm. While such an approach works well for surface-level storyboards, it is not universal. Indeed, recent scholars such as Eric Berlatsky have noted that imposing such a standard model on multifaceted texts with more elusive frames hinders the ability for meaning, causing researchers to undermine and neglect the holistic readings of the work at hand. Thus, when examining Kate Chopin’s short stories “A Lady of Bayou St. John” and “La Belle Zoraïde,” texts which share the same cast of characters, this review employs and illustrates the multiple frame comic approach, which through the incorporation of a kaleidoscope of frames, allows readers to go beyond the sorrowful plot and make new discoveries concerning colorism and power imbalances on homeownership, marriage, and more in the reconstructing south.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Katie Frye

Funding Source or Research Program

Summer Undergraduate Research Program

Location

Waves Cafeteria

Start Date

25-3-2022 2:00 PM

End Date

25-3-2022 3:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 2:00 PM Mar 25th, 3:00 PM

Frame Narratives Within the Short Stories of Kate Chopin

Waves Cafeteria

Traditionally, scholars have interpreted framed stories such as Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness using the conventional “picture-frame” narratological approach. Otherwise known as the nested narrative, the “picture-frame” model perceives works via a structural binary akin to the usual “story within a story” paradigm. While such an approach works well for surface-level storyboards, it is not universal. Indeed, recent scholars such as Eric Berlatsky have noted that imposing such a standard model on multifaceted texts with more elusive frames hinders the ability for meaning, causing researchers to undermine and neglect the holistic readings of the work at hand. Thus, when examining Kate Chopin’s short stories “A Lady of Bayou St. John” and “La Belle Zoraïde,” texts which share the same cast of characters, this review employs and illustrates the multiple frame comic approach, which through the incorporation of a kaleidoscope of frames, allows readers to go beyond the sorrowful plot and make new discoveries concerning colorism and power imbalances on homeownership, marriage, and more in the reconstructing south.