Presentation Title

The composition and functional potential of the human mammary microbiota prior to and following breast tumor development.

Presentation Type

Poster

Keywords

breast tissue microbiota, mammary microbiota, microbiome, functional bacteriome, pre-diagnostic

Department

Biology

Major

Biology

Abstract

Introduction: Shifts in the abundance of mammary tissue bacterial taxa have been associated with benign and malignant breast tumors. We analyzed sequencing data from microbial DNA isolated from mammary tissue in normal (H) and pre-diagnostic (PD, tissue donated prior to breast cancer development) mammary tissue donated to Susan G. Komen Tissue Bank (KTB) and adjacent normal (AN) and tumor (T) tissue donated to Indiana University Simon Cancer Center (IUSCC) tissue bank. We also predicted the function of microbiota in the tissue based upon this data.

Methods: We analyzed four subsets of tissues: H (n = 50), PD (n = 15), AN (n = 50) and T (n = 50) selected from the KTB and IUSCC tissue bank. DNA isolated from all 165 tissue samples was submitted for Illumina Miseq paired-end sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S gene. Diversity metrics were measured through analysis of amplicon sequence variants (ASVs). Significant ASVs were identified through Deseq2 in R, which was also used to identify significant genes predicted through the Piphillin server.

Results/Conclusions: Bacterial compositional analyses revealed an intermediary signature in PD tissue. Specifically, significant ASVs found in PD tissue relative to H tissue follow similar trends in abundance to AN and T ASVs. Predicted metabolic pathways highlight metabolic reprogramming in microbiota of PD tissue, such as in a decrease in microbial lipid metabolism. This data suggests a unique bacterial compositional and functional signature prior to and following breast tumor development. Future analysis of host-microbiota interaction may further elucidate the impact of these findings.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Leah Stiemsma

Funding Source or Research Program

Academic Year Undergraduate Research Initiative, Undergraduate Research Fellowship

Presentation Session

Session E

Start Date

23-4-2021 3:30 PM

End Date

23-4-2021 3:45 PM

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Apr 23rd, 3:30 PM Apr 23rd, 3:45 PM

The composition and functional potential of the human mammary microbiota prior to and following breast tumor development.

Introduction: Shifts in the abundance of mammary tissue bacterial taxa have been associated with benign and malignant breast tumors. We analyzed sequencing data from microbial DNA isolated from mammary tissue in normal (H) and pre-diagnostic (PD, tissue donated prior to breast cancer development) mammary tissue donated to Susan G. Komen Tissue Bank (KTB) and adjacent normal (AN) and tumor (T) tissue donated to Indiana University Simon Cancer Center (IUSCC) tissue bank. We also predicted the function of microbiota in the tissue based upon this data.

Methods: We analyzed four subsets of tissues: H (n = 50), PD (n = 15), AN (n = 50) and T (n = 50) selected from the KTB and IUSCC tissue bank. DNA isolated from all 165 tissue samples was submitted for Illumina Miseq paired-end sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S gene. Diversity metrics were measured through analysis of amplicon sequence variants (ASVs). Significant ASVs were identified through Deseq2 in R, which was also used to identify significant genes predicted through the Piphillin server.

Results/Conclusions: Bacterial compositional analyses revealed an intermediary signature in PD tissue. Specifically, significant ASVs found in PD tissue relative to H tissue follow similar trends in abundance to AN and T ASVs. Predicted metabolic pathways highlight metabolic reprogramming in microbiota of PD tissue, such as in a decrease in microbial lipid metabolism. This data suggests a unique bacterial compositional and functional signature prior to and following breast tumor development. Future analysis of host-microbiota interaction may further elucidate the impact of these findings.