Presentation Type

Poster

Keywords

immigration trauma latino children families mental illness

Department

Psychology

Major

Psychology

Abstract

This paper examines the psychological trauma immigrant children experience at the border and the ways in which their mental health is negatively affected, as a result. During the process of migration, children are forced to deal with a wide range of stressors. Psychological trauma, such as border trauma, can lead to mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and cognitive issues (Brabant et al., 2016; Santiago et al., 2018; DeJonckheere, Vaugh, & Jacquez, 2017; East et al., 2018; Fortuna et al., 2016; Ramos et al., 2017). Additionally, countless immigrant children face trauma, such as racism, discrimination, and social isolation, that oftentimes has the potential to follow them throughout the duration of their lives. Although these children need psychological help, they are often discouraged from seeking guidance by parents or a legal system ill-equipped to handle immigration-related trauma. Mental illnesses can have dire impacts on not only the immigrant children but also their families and society as a whole. We expect to find that individuals impacted by immigration trauma will express fear, symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety, and inhibited psychological adjustment. We also expect that those who experience immediate trauma of abandonment and isolation will reflect more severe symptoms of depression and anxiety. Thus, parents who experience high levels of trauma will also have children who experience high levels of trauma.

Faculty Mentor

Tomas Martinez

Funding Source or Research Program

Not Identified

Location

Waves Cafeteria

Start Date

29-3-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

29-3-2019 3:00 PM

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Mar 29th, 2:00 PM Mar 29th, 3:00 PM

The Implications of Trauma on Immigrant Children's Well-Being

Waves Cafeteria

This paper examines the psychological trauma immigrant children experience at the border and the ways in which their mental health is negatively affected, as a result. During the process of migration, children are forced to deal with a wide range of stressors. Psychological trauma, such as border trauma, can lead to mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and cognitive issues (Brabant et al., 2016; Santiago et al., 2018; DeJonckheere, Vaugh, & Jacquez, 2017; East et al., 2018; Fortuna et al., 2016; Ramos et al., 2017). Additionally, countless immigrant children face trauma, such as racism, discrimination, and social isolation, that oftentimes has the potential to follow them throughout the duration of their lives. Although these children need psychological help, they are often discouraged from seeking guidance by parents or a legal system ill-equipped to handle immigration-related trauma. Mental illnesses can have dire impacts on not only the immigrant children but also their families and society as a whole. We expect to find that individuals impacted by immigration trauma will express fear, symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety, and inhibited psychological adjustment. We also expect that those who experience immediate trauma of abandonment and isolation will reflect more severe symptoms of depression and anxiety. Thus, parents who experience high levels of trauma will also have children who experience high levels of trauma.