Author(s)

Noël IngramFollow

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Keywords

subjectivity, social justice, suicidal ideation, neoliberal, cognitive-behavioral treatment, sociocultural factors, social construction

Major

American Studies

Abstract

In her paper, “Suicide and Neoliberalism: An Imminent Critique of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy,” Noël Ingram, following the tradition of scholars such as Philip Cushman and Mark E. Button, challenges the dominant discursive framework of suicide through an examination of one of the dominant psychological therapeutic frameworks used to understand and treat suicidal ideation, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Ingram argues that CBT assumes the site of disorder is situated in the atomized neoliberal subject whose failure to think and behave rationally has led to their suicide attempt. Further, Ingram discusses how the framework of CBT is influenced by inherent neoliberal assumptions with its focus on skill-building, competencies, manuals, and procedures. Ingram concludes by suggesting a reconceptualizing of the factors that lead to suicide with a particular focus on examining the link between suicide and contemporary societal inequities.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Jason Blakley

Funding Source or Research Program

Keck Scholars Program

Presentation Session

Session B

Location

Plaza Classroom 189

Start Date

29-3-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

29-3-2019 3:45 PM

IngramNoelSuicideandNeoliberalism.pdf (154 kB)
Suicide and Neoliberalism Paper

Share

COinS
 
Mar 29th, 3:30 PM Mar 29th, 3:45 PM

Suicide and Neoliberalism: An Imminent Critique of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

Plaza Classroom 189

In her paper, “Suicide and Neoliberalism: An Imminent Critique of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy,” Noël Ingram, following the tradition of scholars such as Philip Cushman and Mark E. Button, challenges the dominant discursive framework of suicide through an examination of one of the dominant psychological therapeutic frameworks used to understand and treat suicidal ideation, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Ingram argues that CBT assumes the site of disorder is situated in the atomized neoliberal subject whose failure to think and behave rationally has led to their suicide attempt. Further, Ingram discusses how the framework of CBT is influenced by inherent neoliberal assumptions with its focus on skill-building, competencies, manuals, and procedures. Ingram concludes by suggesting a reconceptualizing of the factors that lead to suicide with a particular focus on examining the link between suicide and contemporary societal inequities.