Presentation Title

Aria Session

Presentation Type

Performance

Abstract

Ave Maria from OTELLO by Giuseppe Verdi (1813–1901)

Performed by Alexis Raymond Faculty Mentor: Dr. Louise Lofquist

In the fourth act of Giuseppe Verdi’s opera Otello, Desdemona suspects that her husband, Otello, is going to kill her. She kneels before a depiction of the Virgin Mary and begins to pray. Her prayer acts as a plea for forgiveness, not only for herself, but also for all of God's children. She prays for acceptance to those who are loyal to the Lord, and those who are not, those who are young and old, weak and strong, and all those remaining. The aria foreshadows her murder when she asks for the Virgin Mary to be there in the presence of death, the death that will be brought by the hand of her husband Otello immediately following the prayer. The words she speaks are touching, but it is her final call to "Ave" and her last "Amen" that make the piece truly heartbreaking.

Addio, fiorito asil from MADAMA BUTTERFLY by Giacomo Puccini (1854-1924)

Performed by Alex Papandrea Faculty Mentor: Dr. Henry Price

Giacomo Puccini's Madama Butterfly has been a staple in operatic repertoire since the early 20th century. The opera displays the brilliance of Puccini's music, specifically in layering melodic phrases with certain harmonic textures to enhance the plot's intricate drama. In Madama Butterfly the young Japanese girl Cio Cio San (Butterfly) falls in love and marry Lieutenant Benjamin Pinkerton, who leaves Cio Cio San for an American woman after leaving Japan. Throughout the opera, Pinkerton sees Butterfly as a possession rather than a person - something he doesn't truly realize until he leaves her behind. In Pinkerton's aria Addio fiorito asil (Goodbye, flowered refuge), Pinkerton avoids saying goodbye to Cio Cio San and cowardly flees from her home in remorse and regret.

Riez, allez from DON QUICHOTTE by Jules Massenet (1842-1912)

Performed by Fernando Grimaldo Faculty Mentor: Dr. Henry Price

In the aria Riez, allez from Jules Massenet’s opera Don Quichotte, Don Quichotte’s manservant Sancho Panza defends his master from the cruelty of the townspeople. Based on Le chevalier de la longue figure, a play by the poet Jacques Le Lorrain, Don Quichotte tells the tragic story of a noble knight journeying to obtain a necklace for Dulcinée, his love. After Don Quichotte successfully completes this mission, Dulcinee rejects him, and Sancho has to defend his master as the townspeople mock him. This aria demonstrates Massenet’s ability to effectively portray drama through the vocal line and the powerful accompaniment. His romantic style fills the music with passion and is theatrical in its intensity.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Louise Lofquist and Dr. Henry Price

Location

Raitt Recital Hall

Start Date

24-3-2017 5:30 PM

End Date

24-3-2017 5:45 PM

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Mar 24th, 5:30 PM Mar 24th, 5:45 PM

Aria Session

Raitt Recital Hall

Ave Maria from OTELLO by Giuseppe Verdi (1813–1901)

Performed by Alexis Raymond Faculty Mentor: Dr. Louise Lofquist

In the fourth act of Giuseppe Verdi’s opera Otello, Desdemona suspects that her husband, Otello, is going to kill her. She kneels before a depiction of the Virgin Mary and begins to pray. Her prayer acts as a plea for forgiveness, not only for herself, but also for all of God's children. She prays for acceptance to those who are loyal to the Lord, and those who are not, those who are young and old, weak and strong, and all those remaining. The aria foreshadows her murder when she asks for the Virgin Mary to be there in the presence of death, the death that will be brought by the hand of her husband Otello immediately following the prayer. The words she speaks are touching, but it is her final call to "Ave" and her last "Amen" that make the piece truly heartbreaking.

Addio, fiorito asil from MADAMA BUTTERFLY by Giacomo Puccini (1854-1924)

Performed by Alex Papandrea Faculty Mentor: Dr. Henry Price

Giacomo Puccini's Madama Butterfly has been a staple in operatic repertoire since the early 20th century. The opera displays the brilliance of Puccini's music, specifically in layering melodic phrases with certain harmonic textures to enhance the plot's intricate drama. In Madama Butterfly the young Japanese girl Cio Cio San (Butterfly) falls in love and marry Lieutenant Benjamin Pinkerton, who leaves Cio Cio San for an American woman after leaving Japan. Throughout the opera, Pinkerton sees Butterfly as a possession rather than a person - something he doesn't truly realize until he leaves her behind. In Pinkerton's aria Addio fiorito asil (Goodbye, flowered refuge), Pinkerton avoids saying goodbye to Cio Cio San and cowardly flees from her home in remorse and regret.

Riez, allez from DON QUICHOTTE by Jules Massenet (1842-1912)

Performed by Fernando Grimaldo Faculty Mentor: Dr. Henry Price

In the aria Riez, allez from Jules Massenet’s opera Don Quichotte, Don Quichotte’s manservant Sancho Panza defends his master from the cruelty of the townspeople. Based on Le chevalier de la longue figure, a play by the poet Jacques Le Lorrain, Don Quichotte tells the tragic story of a noble knight journeying to obtain a necklace for Dulcinée, his love. After Don Quichotte successfully completes this mission, Dulcinee rejects him, and Sancho has to defend his master as the townspeople mock him. This aria demonstrates Massenet’s ability to effectively portray drama through the vocal line and the powerful accompaniment. His romantic style fills the music with passion and is theatrical in its intensity.