Presentation Title

French Romantics

Presentation Type

Performance

Abstract

Carmen Fantasy by Francis Borne (1840-1920) Performed by Stephanie Yoon Faculty Mentor: Prof. Susan Norman-Greenberg

Francis Borne was a French flutist born in 1840. He is most widely known for this piece, Carmen Fantaisie, which is a solo flute piece adapted from the seductive Habanera aria of Bizet’s opera Carmen. This famous aria is entitled L’amour est un oiseau rebelle and is sung by Carmen, who is typically played by a mezzo-soprano. The aria is known as Habanera because it was inspired by the habanera, a popular eighteenth century Spanish style of music and dance. Francis Borne created a virtuosic theme and variations on the aria’s main theme.

Carmen Fantaisie highlights the flutist’s abilities shown through the extremely fast runs and the stamina it takes to play the piece. With limited places to breathe, it can certainly tire out the player; but the constant energy of the piece keeps the audience captivated until the grand, exhilarating ending.

C’est l’extase by Gabrielle Fauré (1845-1924), Poetry by Paul Verlaine (1844-1896) Performed by Danielle Adair Faculty Mentor: Dr. Louise Lofquist

Gabriel Fauré’s setting of the poem C’est l’extase by Paul Verlaine describes the feelings one has after experiencing a romantic encounter. It is from the poem collection Romances sans paroles [romances without words]. The poem captures the essence of an erotic moment of pleasure that overwhelms the senses. It is a tender yet exhilarating moment shared between lovers that defies explanation except through comparisons to small wonders of nature like “wind shaking the trees” and the “gentle sounds of rustling grass.” Fittingly, the poem ends by showing a deep connection between the souls of the lovers as they give themselves to each other.

Elegie by Jules Massenet (1842-1912), Poetry by Louis Gallet (1835-1898) Performed by Julie Cowger Faculty Mentor: Dr. Melanie Emelio

Jules Massenet wrote over 200 solo vocal songs, but he is most well known for his tragic operas, including Manon, Thaïs, and Werther. Although a number of Massenet’s operas are still often performed today, it is rare indeed to hear his songs in recital. And yet in their day, they were the height of fashion, published almost as soon as they were written and sung in every salon in the land. Louis Gallet was a French writer who was one of Massenet’s most loyal librettists. In fact, he is most famous for the libretto for Thaïs. His literary interests are reflected in a long list of novels, memoirs as well as librettos.

Reminiscent of Massenet’s operatic style, Élegie features one of the most gorgeous, seamless melodies of all time. The passionate sweeping vocal line and delicate chromatic tension make it intoxicating to listen to as well as to perform. However the famous melody was not originally intended for the voice. In 1873 Massenet wrote some incidental music for a play, and one number, Invocation, struck gold. Massenet changed its name to Elegie and arranged the song for cello and piano accompaniment. He only later adapted it for the voice using Gallet’s poetry.

Faculty Mentor

Prof. Susan Norman-Greenburg, Dr. Louise Lofquist, and Dr. Melanie Emelio

Location

Raitt Recital Hall

Start Date

24-3-2017 5:00 PM

End Date

24-3-2017 5:15 PM

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Mar 24th, 5:00 PM Mar 24th, 5:15 PM

French Romantics

Raitt Recital Hall

Carmen Fantasy by Francis Borne (1840-1920) Performed by Stephanie Yoon Faculty Mentor: Prof. Susan Norman-Greenberg

Francis Borne was a French flutist born in 1840. He is most widely known for this piece, Carmen Fantaisie, which is a solo flute piece adapted from the seductive Habanera aria of Bizet’s opera Carmen. This famous aria is entitled L’amour est un oiseau rebelle and is sung by Carmen, who is typically played by a mezzo-soprano. The aria is known as Habanera because it was inspired by the habanera, a popular eighteenth century Spanish style of music and dance. Francis Borne created a virtuosic theme and variations on the aria’s main theme.

Carmen Fantaisie highlights the flutist’s abilities shown through the extremely fast runs and the stamina it takes to play the piece. With limited places to breathe, it can certainly tire out the player; but the constant energy of the piece keeps the audience captivated until the grand, exhilarating ending.

C’est l’extase by Gabrielle Fauré (1845-1924), Poetry by Paul Verlaine (1844-1896) Performed by Danielle Adair Faculty Mentor: Dr. Louise Lofquist

Gabriel Fauré’s setting of the poem C’est l’extase by Paul Verlaine describes the feelings one has after experiencing a romantic encounter. It is from the poem collection Romances sans paroles [romances without words]. The poem captures the essence of an erotic moment of pleasure that overwhelms the senses. It is a tender yet exhilarating moment shared between lovers that defies explanation except through comparisons to small wonders of nature like “wind shaking the trees” and the “gentle sounds of rustling grass.” Fittingly, the poem ends by showing a deep connection between the souls of the lovers as they give themselves to each other.

Elegie by Jules Massenet (1842-1912), Poetry by Louis Gallet (1835-1898) Performed by Julie Cowger Faculty Mentor: Dr. Melanie Emelio

Jules Massenet wrote over 200 solo vocal songs, but he is most well known for his tragic operas, including Manon, Thaïs, and Werther. Although a number of Massenet’s operas are still often performed today, it is rare indeed to hear his songs in recital. And yet in their day, they were the height of fashion, published almost as soon as they were written and sung in every salon in the land. Louis Gallet was a French writer who was one of Massenet’s most loyal librettists. In fact, he is most famous for the libretto for Thaïs. His literary interests are reflected in a long list of novels, memoirs as well as librettos.

Reminiscent of Massenet’s operatic style, Élegie features one of the most gorgeous, seamless melodies of all time. The passionate sweeping vocal line and delicate chromatic tension make it intoxicating to listen to as well as to perform. However the famous melody was not originally intended for the voice. In 1873 Massenet wrote some incidental music for a play, and one number, Invocation, struck gold. Massenet changed its name to Elegie and arranged the song for cello and piano accompaniment. He only later adapted it for the voice using Gallet’s poetry.