Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Keywords

culture, cross-cultural, cultural, diversity, leadership, psychology, religion, practical theology, ministry, pastors, education, student

Department

Religion

Major

M.A. Religion

Abstract

In an attempt to contribute to how ministries and Christian academia is addressing issues of diversity, I am conducting a study to analyze correlations between ethnicity and styles/values of leadership. The goal is to uncover whether or not a particular ethnicity generally prefers one style of leadership over another. Past research on the subject has already seen that, in the business world, certain practices work better than others. For example, those from an Asian culture are more likely to prefer formality and authority as opposed to the collaborative and relationship-oriented style of leadership found in America. I will contribute to the data on these correlations by testing a sample of students from Pepperdine and asking for (a) their race and ethnicity, (b) their preferred leadership style out of the 3 most common leadership styles, and (c) their preferred leadership values out of a list of 5 Christian leadership values. Testing for correlations between these three scales, all reported anonymously, would help inform future ministry leaders or Christian higher education professionals if certain leadership styles or values would work better with certain cultures.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. David Lemley

Funding Source or Research Program

Not Identified

Presentation Session

Session B

Location

Plaza Classroom 190

Start Date

24-3-2017 5:45 PM

End Date

24-3-2017 6:00 PM

 
Mar 24th, 5:45 PM Mar 24th, 6:00 PM

Cultural Diversity in Student Ministry Leadership

Plaza Classroom 190

In an attempt to contribute to how ministries and Christian academia is addressing issues of diversity, I am conducting a study to analyze correlations between ethnicity and styles/values of leadership. The goal is to uncover whether or not a particular ethnicity generally prefers one style of leadership over another. Past research on the subject has already seen that, in the business world, certain practices work better than others. For example, those from an Asian culture are more likely to prefer formality and authority as opposed to the collaborative and relationship-oriented style of leadership found in America. I will contribute to the data on these correlations by testing a sample of students from Pepperdine and asking for (a) their race and ethnicity, (b) their preferred leadership style out of the 3 most common leadership styles, and (c) their preferred leadership values out of a list of 5 Christian leadership values. Testing for correlations between these three scales, all reported anonymously, would help inform future ministry leaders or Christian higher education professionals if certain leadership styles or values would work better with certain cultures.