Presentation Title

Guitar Performances

Presentation Type

Performance

Keywords

guitar

Abstract

“America” from a traditional folk tune, arranged by Philip Lester

Performed by Wesley Park (2:45)

This anonymous melody first appeared in its present form in 1744 and has been used in a variety of patriotic songs, including "My Country 'tis of Thee" written by Samuel Francis Smith after he came across the melody in a German songbook that was given to him by a friend. As the story goes, Smith was so impressed with the melody that he wrote the words in 30 minutes on a scrap piece of paper. He then gave a copy of the lyrics to a music teacher who decided to teach the song to some children. Smith was given the surprise privilege of hearing this beautiful song performed for a first time by a children's chorus in Boston, Massachusetts on July 4th, 1832. This arrangement was done for the guitar by Philip Lester.

“Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child” from a Negro Spiritual, arranged by Patrick Russ

Performed by Ryan Murphy, tenor and Wesley Park, guitar (4:00)

In a letter to a friend, Mark Twain wrote that the spiritual "is entirely beautiful to me and moves me more than any other music can." "Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child" (or “Motherless Child”) is a traditional Negro spiritual dating back to the era of slavery in the United States when it was common practice to sell children of slaves away from their parents. An early performance of this song dates back to the 1870s and, like many traditional songs, it has many variations and has been recorded widely. This arrangement was done for guitar and voice by Patrick Russ.

“Granadinas” by Tomás Barrbera and Raphael Calleja, arranged by Patrick Russ

Performed by Andrew Leidenthal, baritone and Andrew Brig Urias, guitar (4:00)

“Granadinas” is a duet that showcases the technical and expressive capabilities of both singer and guitarist. In this Spanish song written by Tomás Barrbera and Raphael Calleja, the singer expresses his remorse for having to leave the beautiful city of Granada, and for the death of his beloved. This arrangement for the guitar is not a direct transcription of the original accompaniment. The introduction is drawn from a granadinas recorded by Sabicas, the renowned flamenco guitarist. The granadinas is a traditional flamenco form, originating in Granada and made notable by its clearly defined melody, modulations, and dark tone. It makes frequent use of a technique known as rasgueado, which is a fast strumming technique played with the back side of the fingernails. Flourishes of chords on the guitar correspond with a high point in the melodic line to make for a climactic finish. The text of the song is as follows:

Farewell Granada, my Granada,

I'll never return

to see you again.

Ay, what pain!

to live far from your plain

and from the place where rests

the body of my darling.

Toll, bell; bell, toll,

as your sad sound

carries me across the waves,

to those black hours

when in the coffin I saw her,

and felt the cold whiteness

of her lips on mine.

Toll, toll, bell.

Faculty Mentor

Prof. Christopher Parkening

Location

Surfboard Room (Payson Library)

Start Date

1-4-2016 3:30 PM

End Date

1-4-2016 3:45 PM

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Apr 1st, 3:30 PM Apr 1st, 3:45 PM

Guitar Performances

Surfboard Room (Payson Library)

“America” from a traditional folk tune, arranged by Philip Lester

Performed by Wesley Park (2:45)

This anonymous melody first appeared in its present form in 1744 and has been used in a variety of patriotic songs, including "My Country 'tis of Thee" written by Samuel Francis Smith after he came across the melody in a German songbook that was given to him by a friend. As the story goes, Smith was so impressed with the melody that he wrote the words in 30 minutes on a scrap piece of paper. He then gave a copy of the lyrics to a music teacher who decided to teach the song to some children. Smith was given the surprise privilege of hearing this beautiful song performed for a first time by a children's chorus in Boston, Massachusetts on July 4th, 1832. This arrangement was done for the guitar by Philip Lester.

“Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child” from a Negro Spiritual, arranged by Patrick Russ

Performed by Ryan Murphy, tenor and Wesley Park, guitar (4:00)

In a letter to a friend, Mark Twain wrote that the spiritual "is entirely beautiful to me and moves me more than any other music can." "Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child" (or “Motherless Child”) is a traditional Negro spiritual dating back to the era of slavery in the United States when it was common practice to sell children of slaves away from their parents. An early performance of this song dates back to the 1870s and, like many traditional songs, it has many variations and has been recorded widely. This arrangement was done for guitar and voice by Patrick Russ.

“Granadinas” by Tomás Barrbera and Raphael Calleja, arranged by Patrick Russ

Performed by Andrew Leidenthal, baritone and Andrew Brig Urias, guitar (4:00)

“Granadinas” is a duet that showcases the technical and expressive capabilities of both singer and guitarist. In this Spanish song written by Tomás Barrbera and Raphael Calleja, the singer expresses his remorse for having to leave the beautiful city of Granada, and for the death of his beloved. This arrangement for the guitar is not a direct transcription of the original accompaniment. The introduction is drawn from a granadinas recorded by Sabicas, the renowned flamenco guitarist. The granadinas is a traditional flamenco form, originating in Granada and made notable by its clearly defined melody, modulations, and dark tone. It makes frequent use of a technique known as rasgueado, which is a fast strumming technique played with the back side of the fingernails. Flourishes of chords on the guitar correspond with a high point in the melodic line to make for a climactic finish. The text of the song is as follows:

Farewell Granada, my Granada,

I'll never return

to see you again.

Ay, what pain!

to live far from your plain

and from the place where rests

the body of my darling.

Toll, bell; bell, toll,

as your sad sound

carries me across the waves,

to those black hours

when in the coffin I saw her,

and felt the cold whiteness

of her lips on mine.

Toll, toll, bell.