Presentation Title

Human Predation Affects Grunion Spawning Events

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Department

Biology

Major

Biology (BS)

Abstract

The California Grunion, Leuresthes tenuis, spawns out of water on the beaches of Southern California. When the fish leaves the water, terrestrial predators await it. It is common to see birds, on the beach, picking up fish one by one. However, a larger, more threatening predator lurks these beaches and threatens the existence of the Grunion. Humans collect grunion by the handful and basketful for bait, food, sport, and fun. Data collected from a group of citizen scientists, The Grunion Greeters, suggests that Grunion populations are falling. A decrease in large Grunion runs over the years suggests a declining population. Along with run size, Grunion Greeters collect data on human activity on the beach. This study examined the relationship between human hunting activity and the decline in Grunion run size; it was found that hunting has a negative effect on spawning events. With the increasing human population in Southern California, L. tenuis face challenges greater than birds and the predators of the sea.

Faculty Mentor

Karen Martin

Funding Source or Research Program

Summer Undergraduate Research in Biology

Presentation Session

Session C

Location

Rockwell Academic Center 170

Start Date

3-4-2015 4:45 PM

End Date

3-4-2015 5:00 PM

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Apr 3rd, 4:45 PM Apr 3rd, 5:00 PM

Human Predation Affects Grunion Spawning Events

Rockwell Academic Center 170

The California Grunion, Leuresthes tenuis, spawns out of water on the beaches of Southern California. When the fish leaves the water, terrestrial predators await it. It is common to see birds, on the beach, picking up fish one by one. However, a larger, more threatening predator lurks these beaches and threatens the existence of the Grunion. Humans collect grunion by the handful and basketful for bait, food, sport, and fun. Data collected from a group of citizen scientists, The Grunion Greeters, suggests that Grunion populations are falling. A decrease in large Grunion runs over the years suggests a declining population. Along with run size, Grunion Greeters collect data on human activity on the beach. This study examined the relationship between human hunting activity and the decline in Grunion run size; it was found that hunting has a negative effect on spawning events. With the increasing human population in Southern California, L. tenuis face challenges greater than birds and the predators of the sea.