Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Keywords

shoulder biomechanics, musician posture, EMG, lumbar support

Department

Sports Medicine

Major

Sports Medicine, B.S.

Abstract

Instrument-specific holding mechanics in violinists likely contribute to a high incidence of playing related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs). The inclusion of a lumbar support while playing may alleviate potential risks for PRMDs. PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of lumbar support on left holding shoulder musculature electromyography (EMG) activity and thigh, trunk, and hip kinematics. METHODS: Eleven (6 F; 5 M) collegiate musicians (19.5±1.3 years, 1.71±0.1 m, 68.1±7.7 kg, playing experience: 10.0±3.9 years, weekly playing time: 14.1±8.2 hours) gave voluntary informed consent and performed Prelude from Suite No. 1 in G Major (JS Bach, BWV 1007) with and without a lumbar support. Average and normalized mean RMS EMG activation for eight shoulder muscles were determined for both the beginning (measures 1–4) and end sections (measures 39–42) of the piece. Mean absolute hip kinematic values were calculated from absolute trunk and thigh angles and computed at 20% normalized time intervals during each music section. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess the effects of lumbar support and time (beginning and end sections) on shoulder musculature EMG and hip kinematics. RESULTS: Significant differences (p<0.05) were observed in EMG activation between the beginning section and end section for the anterior deltoid, lower trapezius fibers, pectoralis major, and biceps brachii. A nonsignificant trend of higher EMG activation was observed in the beginning section for holding shoulder musculature EMG with the exception of the triceps brachii. Neither section nor lumbar support altered any kinematic measures. CONCLUSION: The task of playing a violin and the resultant natural dynamic movement that occurs during a music performance was not altered by the presence of absence of a lumbar support. Thus, a lumbar support likely has minimal effect on the risk of PRMDs in violinists.

Faculty Mentor

Michael T. Soucy

Funding Source or Research Program

Summer Undergraduate Research Program

Presentation Session

Session E

Start Date

23-4-2021 4:00 PM

End Date

23-4-2021 4:15 PM

Included in

Biomechanics Commons

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Apr 23rd, 4:00 PM Apr 23rd, 4:15 PM

The Effect of Lumbar Support on Holding Shoulder Electromyography and Trunk Kinematics in Collegiate Violinists

Instrument-specific holding mechanics in violinists likely contribute to a high incidence of playing related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs). The inclusion of a lumbar support while playing may alleviate potential risks for PRMDs. PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of lumbar support on left holding shoulder musculature electromyography (EMG) activity and thigh, trunk, and hip kinematics. METHODS: Eleven (6 F; 5 M) collegiate musicians (19.5±1.3 years, 1.71±0.1 m, 68.1±7.7 kg, playing experience: 10.0±3.9 years, weekly playing time: 14.1±8.2 hours) gave voluntary informed consent and performed Prelude from Suite No. 1 in G Major (JS Bach, BWV 1007) with and without a lumbar support. Average and normalized mean RMS EMG activation for eight shoulder muscles were determined for both the beginning (measures 1–4) and end sections (measures 39–42) of the piece. Mean absolute hip kinematic values were calculated from absolute trunk and thigh angles and computed at 20% normalized time intervals during each music section. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess the effects of lumbar support and time (beginning and end sections) on shoulder musculature EMG and hip kinematics. RESULTS: Significant differences (p<0.05) were observed in EMG activation between the beginning section and end section for the anterior deltoid, lower trapezius fibers, pectoralis major, and biceps brachii. A nonsignificant trend of higher EMG activation was observed in the beginning section for holding shoulder musculature EMG with the exception of the triceps brachii. Neither section nor lumbar support altered any kinematic measures. CONCLUSION: The task of playing a violin and the resultant natural dynamic movement that occurs during a music performance was not altered by the presence of absence of a lumbar support. Thus, a lumbar support likely has minimal effect on the risk of PRMDs in violinists.