Presentation Title

Multidimensional balance differentially associates with maximal handgrip and estimated cardiorespiratory fitness in youth with visual impairments

Presentation Type

Poster

Keywords

muscular strength, blind, postural control, health-related, cardiovascular

Department

Sports Medicine

Major

Sports Medicine

Abstract

Balance is a complex motor skill that may (in)directly influence movement- and health-promoting outcomes (e.g., health-related fitness [HRF]). Youth with visual impairments (YVI) tend to have decreased HRF (e.g., cardiorespiratory endurance) and motor-related (e.g., balance) performance. Investigations between balance and HRF measures in YVI are warranted as balance may influence such outcomes. The purpose of this secondary data analysis was to investigate for associations between a multidimensional balance assessment and two forms of HRF (i.e., cardiorespiratory fitness; muscular strength) in YVI. Sixty-two YVI (Mage=13.26y, SD=2.23y) completed the Brief-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Brief-BESTest), muscular strength (i.e., maximum handgrip; kg), and cardiorespiratory fitness (i.e., PACER) tests. Raw PACER scores were converted into estimated VO2max values (mL/kg/min) using an age-based prediction equation. Spearman bivariate correlation coefficients (rho) were calculated between total- and item-level Brief-BESTest scores, maximal grip, and estimated VO2max values. The alpha level for statistical significance was set at .05. Total Brief-BESTest scores were associated with maximal grip strength (rho=.32). Of the item-specific Brief-BESTest scores, maximal grip strength was associated with reactive compensatory stepping to the right side (rho=.33), hip lateral strength (rho=.26), and right-leg unipedal stance (rho=.27). Estimated VO2max values were associated with the timed up and go test (rho=.46) and left-leg unipedal stance (rho=.30). The correlation between estimated VO2max and total Brief-BESTest score trended toward significance. This analysis suggests there may be low-to-moderate differential associations between balance, maximal grip strength, and estimated VO2max variables in YVI. This is important as balance enables goal-directed movements and may influence HRF.

Faculty Mentor

Adam Pennell

Presentation Session

Session D

Start Date

23-4-2021 2:45 PM

End Date

23-4-2021 3:00 PM

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Apr 23rd, 2:45 PM Apr 23rd, 3:00 PM

Multidimensional balance differentially associates with maximal handgrip and estimated cardiorespiratory fitness in youth with visual impairments

Balance is a complex motor skill that may (in)directly influence movement- and health-promoting outcomes (e.g., health-related fitness [HRF]). Youth with visual impairments (YVI) tend to have decreased HRF (e.g., cardiorespiratory endurance) and motor-related (e.g., balance) performance. Investigations between balance and HRF measures in YVI are warranted as balance may influence such outcomes. The purpose of this secondary data analysis was to investigate for associations between a multidimensional balance assessment and two forms of HRF (i.e., cardiorespiratory fitness; muscular strength) in YVI. Sixty-two YVI (Mage=13.26y, SD=2.23y) completed the Brief-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Brief-BESTest), muscular strength (i.e., maximum handgrip; kg), and cardiorespiratory fitness (i.e., PACER) tests. Raw PACER scores were converted into estimated VO2max values (mL/kg/min) using an age-based prediction equation. Spearman bivariate correlation coefficients (rho) were calculated between total- and item-level Brief-BESTest scores, maximal grip, and estimated VO2max values. The alpha level for statistical significance was set at .05. Total Brief-BESTest scores were associated with maximal grip strength (rho=.32). Of the item-specific Brief-BESTest scores, maximal grip strength was associated with reactive compensatory stepping to the right side (rho=.33), hip lateral strength (rho=.26), and right-leg unipedal stance (rho=.27). Estimated VO2max values were associated with the timed up and go test (rho=.46) and left-leg unipedal stance (rho=.30). The correlation between estimated VO2max and total Brief-BESTest score trended toward significance. This analysis suggests there may be low-to-moderate differential associations between balance, maximal grip strength, and estimated VO2max variables in YVI. This is important as balance enables goal-directed movements and may influence HRF.