Presentation Title

Subject, Country, Newspaper, and Time as Factors Influencing Protest Coverage: A Comparative Analysis between the United States and France

Author(s)

Amber OttoFollow

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Department

Political Science

Major

Political Science and French Studies

Abstract

This study compares how France and United States based newspapers covered the Black Lives Matter Movement taking place in France and the United States in 2020 to how the same newspapers covered the protests of the Gilets Jaunes in France. I take into account the ideological leaning of the newspapers, the country of the newspapers, the country of the protests, the subject of the protests, and time in a binary logistic regression to decipher which variables made a protest or social movement more likely to receive thematic coverage. The results indicate that the subject of the protest and the ideological leaning of the newspaper were two of the most influential variables for if a protest received thematic coverage. Overall, the protests of the Gilets Jaunes were the most likely to receive thematic coverage, and in general, left-leaning newspapers tended to provide more thematic coverage than right-leaning newspapers. While only taking into account the percent of thematic coverage given to the Black Lives Matter Movement, France-based newspapers were more likely to discuss structural racism in the United States than in France, while United States-based newspapers were more likely to discuss structural racism in France than in the United States. I discuss French universalism while analyzing the results.

Faculty Mentor

Joel Fetzer

Funding Source or Research Program

Political Science Honors Program

Presentation Session

Session B

Start Date

23-4-2021 2:45 PM

End Date

23-4-2021 3:00 PM

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Apr 23rd, 2:45 PM Apr 23rd, 3:00 PM

Subject, Country, Newspaper, and Time as Factors Influencing Protest Coverage: A Comparative Analysis between the United States and France

This study compares how France and United States based newspapers covered the Black Lives Matter Movement taking place in France and the United States in 2020 to how the same newspapers covered the protests of the Gilets Jaunes in France. I take into account the ideological leaning of the newspapers, the country of the newspapers, the country of the protests, the subject of the protests, and time in a binary logistic regression to decipher which variables made a protest or social movement more likely to receive thematic coverage. The results indicate that the subject of the protest and the ideological leaning of the newspaper were two of the most influential variables for if a protest received thematic coverage. Overall, the protests of the Gilets Jaunes were the most likely to receive thematic coverage, and in general, left-leaning newspapers tended to provide more thematic coverage than right-leaning newspapers. While only taking into account the percent of thematic coverage given to the Black Lives Matter Movement, France-based newspapers were more likely to discuss structural racism in the United States than in France, while United States-based newspapers were more likely to discuss structural racism in France than in the United States. I discuss French universalism while analyzing the results.