Presentation Title

Self-Determination, Autonomous Motivation, Self-Efficacy, Acculturation and Ethnic Identity in Latinx College Bound Students

Presentation Type

Poster

Department

Psychology

Major

Psychology/Hispanic Studies

Abstract

This study looks at the dimensions of self-determination, autonomous motivation, self-efficacy, acculturation and the ethnic identity of Latino/a college-bound students. The intent of this study is to understand more about how these concepts influence a person’s level of expectations for success while entering college. A survey assessing different dimensions, from current research was created to measure each condition. The literature review integrated previous research in these areas, which aided in the determination of what factors to consider. The survey data is expected to provide insight and information on how Latino/a college-bound youth cope with their level of acculturation, and its influence on self-efficacy, autonomous motivation, self-determination, and ethnic identity. The intent of the study is to measure personal self-efficacy, acculturation, cultural values, academic performance, and familial self-efficacy in the adolescent and young adult Latino/a population. The data will be analyzed against perceived acculturation levels, and the different scales will be statistically analyzed by a multiple regression test. After examining past literature on the subject, several scales were found that have valid and reliable measures. The present survey incorporates questions related to vocational aspirations-expectation gap, educational aspirations and expectations, obstacles to education, and perceived collective family efficacy. These include questions from The Children’s Self-efficacy scale, Generalized Self-Efficacy scale (Bandura, 2006), The Acculturation Scale for Mexican Americans (ARSMA) (Cuellar, 1980), and the Multigroup Ethnic Identity scale (MEIM) (Phinney, 1992). The goal is to gather data on 100 college-bound Latino/a students. These measures will determine how Latino/a youth view their acculturation process and self-efficacy as a result of their experiences with their culture, academic experience, and family. This study will benefit academic counselors as they help students make decisions about their educational experiences after high school, taking into consideration the effects of acculturation, self-efficacy, and ethnic identity on these areas of functioning towards academic success.

Faculty Mentor

Tomas Martinez

Funding Source or Research Program

Academic Year Undergraduate Research Initiative

Location

Waves Cafeteria

Start Date

29-3-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

29-3-2019 3:00 PM

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Mar 29th, 2:00 PM Mar 29th, 3:00 PM

Self-Determination, Autonomous Motivation, Self-Efficacy, Acculturation and Ethnic Identity in Latinx College Bound Students

Waves Cafeteria

This study looks at the dimensions of self-determination, autonomous motivation, self-efficacy, acculturation and the ethnic identity of Latino/a college-bound students. The intent of this study is to understand more about how these concepts influence a person’s level of expectations for success while entering college. A survey assessing different dimensions, from current research was created to measure each condition. The literature review integrated previous research in these areas, which aided in the determination of what factors to consider. The survey data is expected to provide insight and information on how Latino/a college-bound youth cope with their level of acculturation, and its influence on self-efficacy, autonomous motivation, self-determination, and ethnic identity. The intent of the study is to measure personal self-efficacy, acculturation, cultural values, academic performance, and familial self-efficacy in the adolescent and young adult Latino/a population. The data will be analyzed against perceived acculturation levels, and the different scales will be statistically analyzed by a multiple regression test. After examining past literature on the subject, several scales were found that have valid and reliable measures. The present survey incorporates questions related to vocational aspirations-expectation gap, educational aspirations and expectations, obstacles to education, and perceived collective family efficacy. These include questions from The Children’s Self-efficacy scale, Generalized Self-Efficacy scale (Bandura, 2006), The Acculturation Scale for Mexican Americans (ARSMA) (Cuellar, 1980), and the Multigroup Ethnic Identity scale (MEIM) (Phinney, 1992). The goal is to gather data on 100 college-bound Latino/a students. These measures will determine how Latino/a youth view their acculturation process and self-efficacy as a result of their experiences with their culture, academic experience, and family. This study will benefit academic counselors as they help students make decisions about their educational experiences after high school, taking into consideration the effects of acculturation, self-efficacy, and ethnic identity on these areas of functioning towards academic success.