Presentation Title

Physical activity and psychosocial well-being during pregnancy in Mexican-American women.

Presentation Type

Poster

Keywords

Mexican-American, women, Mixtecan, physical activity, psychosocial well-being, pregnancy, acculturation, KPAS, PHQ-9

Department

Sports Medicine

Major

Psychology

Abstract

Physical activity during pregnancy is associated with improved physical health and emotional well-being. National data indicate that levels of physical activity are lower in Mexican-American women compared to non-Hispanic white women, who have largely been the focus of previous research. We examined physical activity and psychosocial well-being in a group of postpartum Mexican-American women (n=100, 18-35 y) who received prenatal care from a tertiary care clinic in Ventura, CA. Subjects completed a written questionnaire (translated into Spanish) in order to assess physical activity (Kaiser Physical Activity Survey) and level of acculturation. Medical records were obtained for clinical data including gestational anthropometrics and psychosocial well-being as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). This sample of women (n=73) were predominantly of Mixtecan origin with low levels of acculturation (1.14 ± 0.66; scale 1-5). When comparing subdomains of physical activity during pregnancy (scale 0-5), women were least involved in sport/exercise (1.94 ± 0.95) and reported slightly higher levels of activity in the categories of active living habits (2.89 ± 0.61) and household/caregiving (2.16 ± 0.94). Depression scores (scale 0-29) increased from the 2nd trimester (3.1 ± 3.6) to the 3rd trimester (3.4 ± 4.4). We propose to do perform additional analyses to examine the a) relationship between physical activity during pregnancy and physical activity during postpartum, b) relationship between physical activity (pregnancy and postpartum) and depression scores, and c) influence of acculturation on health behaviors (e.g., physical activity and breastfeeding) and health outcomes (e.g., depression).

Faculty Mentor

Cooker Storm

Funding Source or Research Program

Summer Undergraduate Research Program

Location

Waves Cafeteria

Start Date

29-3-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

29-3-2019 3:00 PM

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Mar 29th, 2:00 PM Mar 29th, 3:00 PM

Physical activity and psychosocial well-being during pregnancy in Mexican-American women.

Waves Cafeteria

Physical activity during pregnancy is associated with improved physical health and emotional well-being. National data indicate that levels of physical activity are lower in Mexican-American women compared to non-Hispanic white women, who have largely been the focus of previous research. We examined physical activity and psychosocial well-being in a group of postpartum Mexican-American women (n=100, 18-35 y) who received prenatal care from a tertiary care clinic in Ventura, CA. Subjects completed a written questionnaire (translated into Spanish) in order to assess physical activity (Kaiser Physical Activity Survey) and level of acculturation. Medical records were obtained for clinical data including gestational anthropometrics and psychosocial well-being as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). This sample of women (n=73) were predominantly of Mixtecan origin with low levels of acculturation (1.14 ± 0.66; scale 1-5). When comparing subdomains of physical activity during pregnancy (scale 0-5), women were least involved in sport/exercise (1.94 ± 0.95) and reported slightly higher levels of activity in the categories of active living habits (2.89 ± 0.61) and household/caregiving (2.16 ± 0.94). Depression scores (scale 0-29) increased from the 2nd trimester (3.1 ± 3.6) to the 3rd trimester (3.4 ± 4.4). We propose to do perform additional analyses to examine the a) relationship between physical activity during pregnancy and physical activity during postpartum, b) relationship between physical activity (pregnancy and postpartum) and depression scores, and c) influence of acculturation on health behaviors (e.g., physical activity and breastfeeding) and health outcomes (e.g., depression).