Presentation Title

The First English Translation of the World’s Oldest Surviving Latin Gospel Harmony

Presentation Type

Poster

Keywords

Bible, Latin, Translation, Gospel Harmony, Codex Fuldensis, Capitula, Tatian, Diatesseron, Greek, Syriac, Vulgate

Department

Religion

Major

History

Abstract

Between the years 541-546, Victor of Capua commissioned a Latin transcription of the New Testament, which would come to be known as Codex Fuldensis (now housed in Fulda, Germany, as Cod. Bon. 1). Oddly, the Gospels are reproduced in harmonized form and this manuscript proves to be the oldest surviving translation of Tatian’s Diatessaron, a gospel harmony from the second century. Unfortunately the text has been “vulgatized” to read like Jerome’s Latin Vulgate, which erases distinct second-century readings. Our research focuses on the transcription and translation of the Capitula, or table of contents, which consist of 182 chapter headings. Our findings not only offer the first English translation of this work, but a study of how the Capitula differ from the text of the harmony. The Capitula contain “Old Latin” readings that predate Jerome’s Vulgate, and therefore may provide clues as to how Tatian’s second-century harmony was first translated into Latin from either Greek or Syriac.

Faculty Mentor

Nicholas Zola

Funding Source or Research Program

Academic Year Undergraduate Research Initiative

Location

Waves Cafeteria

Start Date

23-3-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

23-3-2018 3:30 PM

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Mar 23rd, 2:00 PM Mar 23rd, 3:30 PM

The First English Translation of the World’s Oldest Surviving Latin Gospel Harmony

Waves Cafeteria

Between the years 541-546, Victor of Capua commissioned a Latin transcription of the New Testament, which would come to be known as Codex Fuldensis (now housed in Fulda, Germany, as Cod. Bon. 1). Oddly, the Gospels are reproduced in harmonized form and this manuscript proves to be the oldest surviving translation of Tatian’s Diatessaron, a gospel harmony from the second century. Unfortunately the text has been “vulgatized” to read like Jerome’s Latin Vulgate, which erases distinct second-century readings. Our research focuses on the transcription and translation of the Capitula, or table of contents, which consist of 182 chapter headings. Our findings not only offer the first English translation of this work, but a study of how the Capitula differ from the text of the harmony. The Capitula contain “Old Latin” readings that predate Jerome’s Vulgate, and therefore may provide clues as to how Tatian’s second-century harmony was first translated into Latin from either Greek or Syriac.