Presentation Title

ZumUp: Building a Healthier Community

Presentation Type

Poster

Keywords

zumba, power, exercise, fitness, health

Department

Sports Medicine

Major

Sports Medicine

Abstract

Approximately 70% of Ontario residents are Hispanic, with 98% of children eligible for free lunch, and 67% of the population classified as overweight or obese. The goal of this project was to increase physical activity and healthy food consumption among women living in Ontario through free Zumba dance classes. Twenty-nine women completed 16 weeks of Zumba dance classes, meeting 2x/wk. Physical and behavioral measures were taken before and after 8 and 16 weeks of training. The physical measures included lower body power (# of sit-to-stands in 30 sec) and mobility (timed-up-and-go, TUG) along with waist circumference and body mass index (BMI). The behavioral measures included perceived confidence in one’s ability to walk 1 mile, perceived confidence in one’s ability to carry 20 pounds for 10 meters, self-reported servings of fruits/vegetables and sugar beverages consumed, as well as mood before and after a Zumba class.

There was a significant improvement in lower body power, F (2, 52) = 4.33, p = 0.02, and this improvement was significant after 8 and 16 weeks. There also was a significant increase in perceived self-confidence in walking 1 mile, F (2, 54) = 10.86, p = 0.000, and this increased confidence was significant after 8 and 16 weeks. Participation in a single Zumba class significantly improved mood at the initial assessment, t (29) = -11.06, p = 0.000, after 8 weeks, t (44) = -12.49, p = 0.000, and after 16 weeks t (39) = -10.66, p = 0.000. There were no other significant changes. We conclude that Zumba training was effective in improving lower body power, perceived confidence in walking and carrying as well as mood in women.

Faculty Mentor

Priscilla MacRae, Ph.D., Professor of Sports Medicine

Funding Source or Research Program

Academic Year Undergraduate Research Initiative

Location

Waves Cafeteria

Start Date

24-3-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

24-3-2017 3:00 PM

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Mar 24th, 2:00 PM Mar 24th, 3:00 PM

ZumUp: Building a Healthier Community

Waves Cafeteria

Approximately 70% of Ontario residents are Hispanic, with 98% of children eligible for free lunch, and 67% of the population classified as overweight or obese. The goal of this project was to increase physical activity and healthy food consumption among women living in Ontario through free Zumba dance classes. Twenty-nine women completed 16 weeks of Zumba dance classes, meeting 2x/wk. Physical and behavioral measures were taken before and after 8 and 16 weeks of training. The physical measures included lower body power (# of sit-to-stands in 30 sec) and mobility (timed-up-and-go, TUG) along with waist circumference and body mass index (BMI). The behavioral measures included perceived confidence in one’s ability to walk 1 mile, perceived confidence in one’s ability to carry 20 pounds for 10 meters, self-reported servings of fruits/vegetables and sugar beverages consumed, as well as mood before and after a Zumba class.

There was a significant improvement in lower body power, F (2, 52) = 4.33, p = 0.02, and this improvement was significant after 8 and 16 weeks. There also was a significant increase in perceived self-confidence in walking 1 mile, F (2, 54) = 10.86, p = 0.000, and this increased confidence was significant after 8 and 16 weeks. Participation in a single Zumba class significantly improved mood at the initial assessment, t (29) = -11.06, p = 0.000, after 8 weeks, t (44) = -12.49, p = 0.000, and after 16 weeks t (39) = -10.66, p = 0.000. There were no other significant changes. We conclude that Zumba training was effective in improving lower body power, perceived confidence in walking and carrying as well as mood in women.