Presentation Title

Classical Guitar Performances

Presentation Type

Performance

Abstract

Romanza – Anonymous

Performed by Hope Mueller Faculty Mentor: Prof. Christopher Parkening

Romanza is a traditional folk melody of Spain. While many would love to take credit for this famous classical guitar piece, the composer is still indeed unknown. However, it was likely composed in the late nineteenth century. Over the last several decades, Romanza has taken many different forms with each artist recording the piece in a different way, rearranging it to make it even more unique. This piece has been recorded by the classical guitars most renown artists such as Francisco Tarrega, John Williams, and Christopher Parkening. Through the years, the one thing that remains pure about this piece is the beautiful melody. The haunting melody of the minor section or the “A” section acts as a gentle guide into the second section in a major key. The smooth melody played on both the first and second string accompanied by the low bass notes reflect the beauty and warmth of this instrument.

“Koyunbaba (The Shepherd)” by Carlo Domeniconi (b. 1947)

Performed by Wesley Park Faculty Mentor: Prof. Christopher Parkening

Italian-born Domeniconi is a very popular composer and guitarist. He began studying the guitar at the age of 13 and also started to compose pieces around that time. After moving to Istanbul, he ended up teaching guitar as the first teacher at the Istanbul conservatory.

Domeniconi achieved international fame with “Koyunbaba.” Koyunbaba is the name of a region in southwestern Turkey, and the name translates to “sheep father” or “shepherd.” The piece started as an improvisation that gradually turned into a full piece. It utilizes a unique tuning for the guitar, which is an open C-sharp minor chord, which leaves only the first string remaining at normal pitch. “Koyunbaba” has been played and recorded by many great musicians, including Christopher Parkening, David Russell, and John Williams.

Spanish Dance No. 1 from La Vida Breve: Manuel de Falla (1876-1946) trans. Emilio Pujol

Performed by Sergio Gallardo and Cody Noriega Faculty Mentor: Prof. Christopher Parkening

Spanish composer, Manuel de Falla, born in 1876, was the central figure of twentieth-century Spanish music. He started learning piano with his mother at a very early age, and he soon discovered a passion for performing, composing, and writing librettos. De Falla eventually enrolled in the Madrid Conservatory, where he won several honors in piano and composition. His music had deep Spanish roots, inspired particularly by Andalucian flamenco. However, he lived and studied in Paris from 1907 to 1914, and Ravel, Debussy, and Dukas influenced his style. His music provided a unique perspective on most of the salient concerns of modernist musical aesthetics, such as neo-classicism, nationalism, parody, allusion, and the role of tonality.

One of Manuel de Falla’s most popular works is La vida Breve, an opera that won him the first place in the Spanish Opera competition of the prestigious Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in 1905. The opera tells the story of a young Gypsy lady, Salud, who is madly in love with Paco, a man of the Spanish high class. Even though Paco claims he loves her and will be eternally faithful, Salud hears the rumor that he will soon marry a girl of his own prosperous class. She finds out the rumor is true, so she goes to Paco’s wedding. Heartbroken, she gathers the courage to accuse Paco in front of the crowd, but as she moves towards him, she falters and falls dead, hence the name of the opera, La Vida Breve (The Short Life). De Falla’s score is appealing, touching, colorful, and full of character. The Danse in Act 2 is one of de Falla’s most popular pieces, and is often performed separately as Spanish Dance No. 1.

Spanish guitarist and composer, Emilio Pujol’s, transcription of the Spanish Dance No. 1 from La Vida Breve is considered to be the most exciting piece ever transcribed for two guitars.

Faculty Mentor

Prof. Christopher Parkening

Location

Raitt Recital Hall

Start Date

24-3-2017 6:00 PM

End Date

24-3-2017 6:15 PM

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Mar 24th, 6:00 PM Mar 24th, 6:15 PM

Classical Guitar Performances

Raitt Recital Hall

Romanza – Anonymous

Performed by Hope Mueller Faculty Mentor: Prof. Christopher Parkening

Romanza is a traditional folk melody of Spain. While many would love to take credit for this famous classical guitar piece, the composer is still indeed unknown. However, it was likely composed in the late nineteenth century. Over the last several decades, Romanza has taken many different forms with each artist recording the piece in a different way, rearranging it to make it even more unique. This piece has been recorded by the classical guitars most renown artists such as Francisco Tarrega, John Williams, and Christopher Parkening. Through the years, the one thing that remains pure about this piece is the beautiful melody. The haunting melody of the minor section or the “A” section acts as a gentle guide into the second section in a major key. The smooth melody played on both the first and second string accompanied by the low bass notes reflect the beauty and warmth of this instrument.

“Koyunbaba (The Shepherd)” by Carlo Domeniconi (b. 1947)

Performed by Wesley Park Faculty Mentor: Prof. Christopher Parkening

Italian-born Domeniconi is a very popular composer and guitarist. He began studying the guitar at the age of 13 and also started to compose pieces around that time. After moving to Istanbul, he ended up teaching guitar as the first teacher at the Istanbul conservatory.

Domeniconi achieved international fame with “Koyunbaba.” Koyunbaba is the name of a region in southwestern Turkey, and the name translates to “sheep father” or “shepherd.” The piece started as an improvisation that gradually turned into a full piece. It utilizes a unique tuning for the guitar, which is an open C-sharp minor chord, which leaves only the first string remaining at normal pitch. “Koyunbaba” has been played and recorded by many great musicians, including Christopher Parkening, David Russell, and John Williams.

Spanish Dance No. 1 from La Vida Breve: Manuel de Falla (1876-1946) trans. Emilio Pujol

Performed by Sergio Gallardo and Cody Noriega Faculty Mentor: Prof. Christopher Parkening

Spanish composer, Manuel de Falla, born in 1876, was the central figure of twentieth-century Spanish music. He started learning piano with his mother at a very early age, and he soon discovered a passion for performing, composing, and writing librettos. De Falla eventually enrolled in the Madrid Conservatory, where he won several honors in piano and composition. His music had deep Spanish roots, inspired particularly by Andalucian flamenco. However, he lived and studied in Paris from 1907 to 1914, and Ravel, Debussy, and Dukas influenced his style. His music provided a unique perspective on most of the salient concerns of modernist musical aesthetics, such as neo-classicism, nationalism, parody, allusion, and the role of tonality.

One of Manuel de Falla’s most popular works is La vida Breve, an opera that won him the first place in the Spanish Opera competition of the prestigious Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in 1905. The opera tells the story of a young Gypsy lady, Salud, who is madly in love with Paco, a man of the Spanish high class. Even though Paco claims he loves her and will be eternally faithful, Salud hears the rumor that he will soon marry a girl of his own prosperous class. She finds out the rumor is true, so she goes to Paco’s wedding. Heartbroken, she gathers the courage to accuse Paco in front of the crowd, but as she moves towards him, she falters and falls dead, hence the name of the opera, La Vida Breve (The Short Life). De Falla’s score is appealing, touching, colorful, and full of character. The Danse in Act 2 is one of de Falla’s most popular pieces, and is often performed separately as Spanish Dance No. 1.

Spanish guitarist and composer, Emilio Pujol’s, transcription of the Spanish Dance No. 1 from La Vida Breve is considered to be the most exciting piece ever transcribed for two guitars.