Presentation Title

How Handedness Direction and Consistency Relate to Declarative Memory Task Performance

Presentation Type

Poster

Major

Psychology

Abstract

While previous research has demonstrated that significant episodic memory differences exist between left and right as well as consistent and inconsistent handers, these differences are contradictory from study to study (Lyle et al., 2012). Furthermore, little inquiry has been done regarding semantic memory ability among left-handers in comparison to their right-handed counterparts. In order to examine potential long-term memory performance differences between left and right-handers, as well as consistent and inconsistent handers, 106 college students completed a handedness inventory and episodic and semantic memory tasks. The results indicated that left-handers had significantly better semantic memory recall than right-handers, a new finding that suggests cerebral lateralization of memory performance and of handedness direction may be independent of one another.

Faculty Mentor

Janet P. Trammell

Funding Source or Research Program

Academic Year Undergraduate Research Initiative

Location

Waves Cafeteria, Tyler Campus Center

Start Date

21-3-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

21-3-2014 3:00 PM

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Mar 21st, 2:00 PM Mar 21st, 3:00 PM

How Handedness Direction and Consistency Relate to Declarative Memory Task Performance

Waves Cafeteria, Tyler Campus Center

While previous research has demonstrated that significant episodic memory differences exist between left and right as well as consistent and inconsistent handers, these differences are contradictory from study to study (Lyle et al., 2012). Furthermore, little inquiry has been done regarding semantic memory ability among left-handers in comparison to their right-handed counterparts. In order to examine potential long-term memory performance differences between left and right-handers, as well as consistent and inconsistent handers, 106 college students completed a handedness inventory and episodic and semantic memory tasks. The results indicated that left-handers had significantly better semantic memory recall than right-handers, a new finding that suggests cerebral lateralization of memory performance and of handedness direction may be independent of one another.